Les voies vertes

Cycle tracks 

The Trans-Ardennes green track

The most recent greenway is also one of the finest in France. From Givet, a border town forming part of the Belgian RAVEL network, to Remilly-Aillicourt via Charleville and Sedan, this 121 km circuit follows the former towpath along the Meuse. 

Whether on foot, bicycle, "rosalie" quadricycle, on rollers or even on horseback, this new itinerary is open to all, and offers numerous opportunities to quench your thirst or to have something to eat.

 A 9 km circuit starting at Remilly-Aillicourt follows the Ennemane as far as the village of Raucourt-et-Flaba using a secure, well-marked cycle track with information panels.

 The "Trans-Ardennes Greenway" is an integral part of a huge European project, "The Meuse by Bicycle", which will shortly offer a continuous circuit along the river from its source in the Haute Marne region to its estuary near Rotterdam.

 

Useful information

• Official Website
• Download the map
• Bike hire
Consider using the TER (regional express trains) to reach your departure point, with your bike.

The Trans-Semoysienne 

Starting from Monthermé, a perfectly lovely circuit follows the Semoy river for 20 km as far as the Belgian frontier. This bicycle track, named the Trans-Semoysienne, leads you to some of the most beautiful views of this picturesque valley, a paradise for nature lovers.

It follows the former railway line along the river, and is dotted with explanatory panels presenting the natural heritage of the Semoy valley and the history of the hamlets it passes through. Before reaching Belgium and its Ravel network, the track gains a little altitude, for the greater pleasure of the more sporting hikers. 

Download the route

The Ennemane Greenway 

The Ennemane river rises close to the village of Raucourt-et-Flaba, and flows from northwards for 11 km, passing through Haraucourt and Angecourt before joining the Meuse near Remilly-Aillicourt.

The Ennemane Greenway follows the watercourse for 9 km along the path of the former railway line which used to supply numerous industrial sites, chiefly specialising in metallurgy. 

Three metres wide, it winds between the trees and crosses streams and wet zones using pontoons. A series of information panels prepared with the assistance of local historians highlights the historical wealth of the area. 

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